09/10/13

I’m submitting this for a competition brief from Eye Candy Festival in Birmingham to produce an alternative take on those boards you can put your head in and take a photo of, that you see at seaside piers in Britain. Winning entry will be displayed at Southside in Birmingham.

I used the brief as a complete excuse to have a bit of fun painting. Enjoy.

20/08/13
Some reportage illustrations from last night’s gig at The Gate Inn, Sutton Coldfield. Sketched these on the spot. Some really talented musicians here.Matthew Socci above, Tom Walker Trio  below 20/08/13
Some reportage illustrations from last night’s gig at The Gate Inn, Sutton Coldfield. Sketched these on the spot. Some really talented musicians here.Matthew Socci above, Tom Walker Trio  below

20/08/13

Some reportage illustrations from last night’s gig at The Gate Inn, Sutton Coldfield. Sketched these on the spot. Some really talented musicians here.

Matthew Socci above, Tom Walker Trio  below

22/07/13

A video of my latest book “The Unusual and Psychedelic A to Z of Human Transport”… please ignore the bad spelling!

I have sold a few mini versions of this printed on my home canon printer, but I may print some larger professional ones depending on how much interest I get!

22/07/13 - Progress!
Apologies for not uploading for an awfully long time. Here are a few of the things that I have been up to over the past few months.I finished an extremely personal university project on The Slightly Unusual and Psychadelic A to Z of Human Transport. If have sold some mini versions of the books, printed on my home canon printer, but I may get some printed up slightly bigger professionally if I have any further interest.I have also been creating a range of personal work since the start of the summer, a few of which you can see above. I am currently working on a zine or graphic novel based in Birmingham, for which I have not yet published any sketches (updates soon!).I have also joined a collective called Calm and Collective (a group of illustrators that works together and collaborates). I have been producing some icebreaker work for this project, including a simple pencil portrait of one of the members, and some Ice Cream themed illustrations.I will be posting more updates on recent work, so stay tuned! 22/07/13 - Progress!
Apologies for not uploading for an awfully long time. Here are a few of the things that I have been up to over the past few months.I finished an extremely personal university project on The Slightly Unusual and Psychadelic A to Z of Human Transport. If have sold some mini versions of the books, printed on my home canon printer, but I may get some printed up slightly bigger professionally if I have any further interest.I have also been creating a range of personal work since the start of the summer, a few of which you can see above. I am currently working on a zine or graphic novel based in Birmingham, for which I have not yet published any sketches (updates soon!).I have also joined a collective called Calm and Collective (a group of illustrators that works together and collaborates). I have been producing some icebreaker work for this project, including a simple pencil portrait of one of the members, and some Ice Cream themed illustrations.I will be posting more updates on recent work, so stay tuned! 22/07/13 - Progress!
Apologies for not uploading for an awfully long time. Here are a few of the things that I have been up to over the past few months.I finished an extremely personal university project on The Slightly Unusual and Psychadelic A to Z of Human Transport. If have sold some mini versions of the books, printed on my home canon printer, but I may get some printed up slightly bigger professionally if I have any further interest.I have also been creating a range of personal work since the start of the summer, a few of which you can see above. I am currently working on a zine or graphic novel based in Birmingham, for which I have not yet published any sketches (updates soon!).I have also joined a collective called Calm and Collective (a group of illustrators that works together and collaborates). I have been producing some icebreaker work for this project, including a simple pencil portrait of one of the members, and some Ice Cream themed illustrations.I will be posting more updates on recent work, so stay tuned! 22/07/13 - Progress!
Apologies for not uploading for an awfully long time. Here are a few of the things that I have been up to over the past few months.I finished an extremely personal university project on The Slightly Unusual and Psychadelic A to Z of Human Transport. If have sold some mini versions of the books, printed on my home canon printer, but I may get some printed up slightly bigger professionally if I have any further interest.I have also been creating a range of personal work since the start of the summer, a few of which you can see above. I am currently working on a zine or graphic novel based in Birmingham, for which I have not yet published any sketches (updates soon!).I have also joined a collective called Calm and Collective (a group of illustrators that works together and collaborates). I have been producing some icebreaker work for this project, including a simple pencil portrait of one of the members, and some Ice Cream themed illustrations.I will be posting more updates on recent work, so stay tuned! 22/07/13 - Progress!
Apologies for not uploading for an awfully long time. Here are a few of the things that I have been up to over the past few months.I finished an extremely personal university project on The Slightly Unusual and Psychadelic A to Z of Human Transport. If have sold some mini versions of the books, printed on my home canon printer, but I may get some printed up slightly bigger professionally if I have any further interest.I have also been creating a range of personal work since the start of the summer, a few of which you can see above. I am currently working on a zine or graphic novel based in Birmingham, for which I have not yet published any sketches (updates soon!).I have also joined a collective called Calm and Collective (a group of illustrators that works together and collaborates). I have been producing some icebreaker work for this project, including a simple pencil portrait of one of the members, and some Ice Cream themed illustrations.I will be posting more updates on recent work, so stay tuned! 22/07/13 - Progress!
Apologies for not uploading for an awfully long time. Here are a few of the things that I have been up to over the past few months.I finished an extremely personal university project on The Slightly Unusual and Psychadelic A to Z of Human Transport. If have sold some mini versions of the books, printed on my home canon printer, but I may get some printed up slightly bigger professionally if I have any further interest.I have also been creating a range of personal work since the start of the summer, a few of which you can see above. I am currently working on a zine or graphic novel based in Birmingham, for which I have not yet published any sketches (updates soon!).I have also joined a collective called Calm and Collective (a group of illustrators that works together and collaborates). I have been producing some icebreaker work for this project, including a simple pencil portrait of one of the members, and some Ice Cream themed illustrations.I will be posting more updates on recent work, so stay tuned! 22/07/13 - Progress!
Apologies for not uploading for an awfully long time. Here are a few of the things that I have been up to over the past few months.I finished an extremely personal university project on The Slightly Unusual and Psychadelic A to Z of Human Transport. If have sold some mini versions of the books, printed on my home canon printer, but I may get some printed up slightly bigger professionally if I have any further interest.I have also been creating a range of personal work since the start of the summer, a few of which you can see above. I am currently working on a zine or graphic novel based in Birmingham, for which I have not yet published any sketches (updates soon!).I have also joined a collective called Calm and Collective (a group of illustrators that works together and collaborates). I have been producing some icebreaker work for this project, including a simple pencil portrait of one of the members, and some Ice Cream themed illustrations.I will be posting more updates on recent work, so stay tuned!

22/07/13 - Progress!

Apologies for not uploading for an awfully long time. Here are a few of the things that I have been up to over the past few months.

I finished an extremely personal university project on The Slightly Unusual and Psychadelic A to Z of Human Transport. If have sold some mini versions of the books, printed on my home canon printer, but I may get some printed up slightly bigger professionally if I have any further interest.

I have also been creating a range of personal work since the start of the summer, a few of which you can see above. I am currently working on a zine or graphic novel based in Birmingham, for which I have not yet published any sketches (updates soon!).

I have also joined a collective called Calm and Collective (a group of illustrators that works together and collaborates). I have been producing some icebreaker work for this project, including a simple pencil portrait of one of the members, and some Ice Cream themed illustrations.

I will be posting more updates on recent work, so stay tuned!

Ikon Gallery, Birmingham Visit
Last week I decided to visit the IKON Gallery in Birmingham centre for some inspiration. I looked at the work of two artists; John Flaxman and Timur Novikov, which I thought were worthy of writing something about.
John Flaxman was a British sculptor born in 1755 who was known internationally for his illustrations and sculptures. I became interested in his artwork because of his use of line. He drew everyday subjects in ordinary situations. He used just a few lines to define their shapes and was capable of capturing figure and movement in just a few pencil flourishes. One of the thinks I really liked was his drapery and depiction of fabric, the contrast between flowing lines and the angular architecture of buildings that surrounded his figures, and the way he was able to make them sit so compositionally well against each other. The illustrations themselves went beyond the drawing and into the physical, three-dimensional sculpture. Each line became a flowing shape within the sculpture.
John Flaxman began his career as a designer for Josiah Wedgwood, who was famous for his pottery. Flaxman had an interest in the classical and conventional values within art. He travelled to Rome for seven years of his life, where he produced many drawings and illustrations, which were then engraved. His drawing style of using simple lines to define shapes developed over these years.

Timur Novikov (1958 - 2002) was a Russian artist born in Leningrad whose work mostly consisted of textiles pieces. His colourful, in ways childlike artwork seem to have a personal meaning to the artist which is difficult to discern. Each piece is recognisably his creation, and they are extremely tactile pieces, with layered and appliqued fabric. This became more prominent as the artist became blind towards the end of his life.
His artwork is bright and iconic and the way he uses the textures and patterns within the fabric creates something quite playful and humorous. He became ill in later life and lost his sight.I have also included some examples of his work as a blind artist. I think it is quite interesting how he was capable of recreating images and objects in chinese ink despite his blindness, and that the physical and tactile process of making the artwork was in ways more important than the end result.
His work made me think about the possibilities of using more than two dimensions in my artwork, and also about the physical process of creating, rather than the final piece of art. Ikon Gallery, Birmingham Visit
Last week I decided to visit the IKON Gallery in Birmingham centre for some inspiration. I looked at the work of two artists; John Flaxman and Timur Novikov, which I thought were worthy of writing something about.
John Flaxman was a British sculptor born in 1755 who was known internationally for his illustrations and sculptures. I became interested in his artwork because of his use of line. He drew everyday subjects in ordinary situations. He used just a few lines to define their shapes and was capable of capturing figure and movement in just a few pencil flourishes. One of the thinks I really liked was his drapery and depiction of fabric, the contrast between flowing lines and the angular architecture of buildings that surrounded his figures, and the way he was able to make them sit so compositionally well against each other. The illustrations themselves went beyond the drawing and into the physical, three-dimensional sculpture. Each line became a flowing shape within the sculpture.
John Flaxman began his career as a designer for Josiah Wedgwood, who was famous for his pottery. Flaxman had an interest in the classical and conventional values within art. He travelled to Rome for seven years of his life, where he produced many drawings and illustrations, which were then engraved. His drawing style of using simple lines to define shapes developed over these years.

Timur Novikov (1958 - 2002) was a Russian artist born in Leningrad whose work mostly consisted of textiles pieces. His colourful, in ways childlike artwork seem to have a personal meaning to the artist which is difficult to discern. Each piece is recognisably his creation, and they are extremely tactile pieces, with layered and appliqued fabric. This became more prominent as the artist became blind towards the end of his life.
His artwork is bright and iconic and the way he uses the textures and patterns within the fabric creates something quite playful and humorous. He became ill in later life and lost his sight.I have also included some examples of his work as a blind artist. I think it is quite interesting how he was capable of recreating images and objects in chinese ink despite his blindness, and that the physical and tactile process of making the artwork was in ways more important than the end result.
His work made me think about the possibilities of using more than two dimensions in my artwork, and also about the physical process of creating, rather than the final piece of art. Ikon Gallery, Birmingham Visit
Last week I decided to visit the IKON Gallery in Birmingham centre for some inspiration. I looked at the work of two artists; John Flaxman and Timur Novikov, which I thought were worthy of writing something about.
John Flaxman was a British sculptor born in 1755 who was known internationally for his illustrations and sculptures. I became interested in his artwork because of his use of line. He drew everyday subjects in ordinary situations. He used just a few lines to define their shapes and was capable of capturing figure and movement in just a few pencil flourishes. One of the thinks I really liked was his drapery and depiction of fabric, the contrast between flowing lines and the angular architecture of buildings that surrounded his figures, and the way he was able to make them sit so compositionally well against each other. The illustrations themselves went beyond the drawing and into the physical, three-dimensional sculpture. Each line became a flowing shape within the sculpture.
John Flaxman began his career as a designer for Josiah Wedgwood, who was famous for his pottery. Flaxman had an interest in the classical and conventional values within art. He travelled to Rome for seven years of his life, where he produced many drawings and illustrations, which were then engraved. His drawing style of using simple lines to define shapes developed over these years.

Timur Novikov (1958 - 2002) was a Russian artist born in Leningrad whose work mostly consisted of textiles pieces. His colourful, in ways childlike artwork seem to have a personal meaning to the artist which is difficult to discern. Each piece is recognisably his creation, and they are extremely tactile pieces, with layered and appliqued fabric. This became more prominent as the artist became blind towards the end of his life.
His artwork is bright and iconic and the way he uses the textures and patterns within the fabric creates something quite playful and humorous. He became ill in later life and lost his sight.I have also included some examples of his work as a blind artist. I think it is quite interesting how he was capable of recreating images and objects in chinese ink despite his blindness, and that the physical and tactile process of making the artwork was in ways more important than the end result.
His work made me think about the possibilities of using more than two dimensions in my artwork, and also about the physical process of creating, rather than the final piece of art. Ikon Gallery, Birmingham Visit
Last week I decided to visit the IKON Gallery in Birmingham centre for some inspiration. I looked at the work of two artists; John Flaxman and Timur Novikov, which I thought were worthy of writing something about.
John Flaxman was a British sculptor born in 1755 who was known internationally for his illustrations and sculptures. I became interested in his artwork because of his use of line. He drew everyday subjects in ordinary situations. He used just a few lines to define their shapes and was capable of capturing figure and movement in just a few pencil flourishes. One of the thinks I really liked was his drapery and depiction of fabric, the contrast between flowing lines and the angular architecture of buildings that surrounded his figures, and the way he was able to make them sit so compositionally well against each other. The illustrations themselves went beyond the drawing and into the physical, three-dimensional sculpture. Each line became a flowing shape within the sculpture.
John Flaxman began his career as a designer for Josiah Wedgwood, who was famous for his pottery. Flaxman had an interest in the classical and conventional values within art. He travelled to Rome for seven years of his life, where he produced many drawings and illustrations, which were then engraved. His drawing style of using simple lines to define shapes developed over these years.

Timur Novikov (1958 - 2002) was a Russian artist born in Leningrad whose work mostly consisted of textiles pieces. His colourful, in ways childlike artwork seem to have a personal meaning to the artist which is difficult to discern. Each piece is recognisably his creation, and they are extremely tactile pieces, with layered and appliqued fabric. This became more prominent as the artist became blind towards the end of his life.
His artwork is bright and iconic and the way he uses the textures and patterns within the fabric creates something quite playful and humorous. He became ill in later life and lost his sight.I have also included some examples of his work as a blind artist. I think it is quite interesting how he was capable of recreating images and objects in chinese ink despite his blindness, and that the physical and tactile process of making the artwork was in ways more important than the end result.
His work made me think about the possibilities of using more than two dimensions in my artwork, and also about the physical process of creating, rather than the final piece of art. Ikon Gallery, Birmingham Visit
Last week I decided to visit the IKON Gallery in Birmingham centre for some inspiration. I looked at the work of two artists; John Flaxman and Timur Novikov, which I thought were worthy of writing something about.
John Flaxman was a British sculptor born in 1755 who was known internationally for his illustrations and sculptures. I became interested in his artwork because of his use of line. He drew everyday subjects in ordinary situations. He used just a few lines to define their shapes and was capable of capturing figure and movement in just a few pencil flourishes. One of the thinks I really liked was his drapery and depiction of fabric, the contrast between flowing lines and the angular architecture of buildings that surrounded his figures, and the way he was able to make them sit so compositionally well against each other. The illustrations themselves went beyond the drawing and into the physical, three-dimensional sculpture. Each line became a flowing shape within the sculpture.
John Flaxman began his career as a designer for Josiah Wedgwood, who was famous for his pottery. Flaxman had an interest in the classical and conventional values within art. He travelled to Rome for seven years of his life, where he produced many drawings and illustrations, which were then engraved. His drawing style of using simple lines to define shapes developed over these years.

Timur Novikov (1958 - 2002) was a Russian artist born in Leningrad whose work mostly consisted of textiles pieces. His colourful, in ways childlike artwork seem to have a personal meaning to the artist which is difficult to discern. Each piece is recognisably his creation, and they are extremely tactile pieces, with layered and appliqued fabric. This became more prominent as the artist became blind towards the end of his life.
His artwork is bright and iconic and the way he uses the textures and patterns within the fabric creates something quite playful and humorous. He became ill in later life and lost his sight.I have also included some examples of his work as a blind artist. I think it is quite interesting how he was capable of recreating images and objects in chinese ink despite his blindness, and that the physical and tactile process of making the artwork was in ways more important than the end result.
His work made me think about the possibilities of using more than two dimensions in my artwork, and also about the physical process of creating, rather than the final piece of art. Ikon Gallery, Birmingham Visit
Last week I decided to visit the IKON Gallery in Birmingham centre for some inspiration. I looked at the work of two artists; John Flaxman and Timur Novikov, which I thought were worthy of writing something about.
John Flaxman was a British sculptor born in 1755 who was known internationally for his illustrations and sculptures. I became interested in his artwork because of his use of line. He drew everyday subjects in ordinary situations. He used just a few lines to define their shapes and was capable of capturing figure and movement in just a few pencil flourishes. One of the thinks I really liked was his drapery and depiction of fabric, the contrast between flowing lines and the angular architecture of buildings that surrounded his figures, and the way he was able to make them sit so compositionally well against each other. The illustrations themselves went beyond the drawing and into the physical, three-dimensional sculpture. Each line became a flowing shape within the sculpture.
John Flaxman began his career as a designer for Josiah Wedgwood, who was famous for his pottery. Flaxman had an interest in the classical and conventional values within art. He travelled to Rome for seven years of his life, where he produced many drawings and illustrations, which were then engraved. His drawing style of using simple lines to define shapes developed over these years.

Timur Novikov (1958 - 2002) was a Russian artist born in Leningrad whose work mostly consisted of textiles pieces. His colourful, in ways childlike artwork seem to have a personal meaning to the artist which is difficult to discern. Each piece is recognisably his creation, and they are extremely tactile pieces, with layered and appliqued fabric. This became more prominent as the artist became blind towards the end of his life.
His artwork is bright and iconic and the way he uses the textures and patterns within the fabric creates something quite playful and humorous. He became ill in later life and lost his sight.I have also included some examples of his work as a blind artist. I think it is quite interesting how he was capable of recreating images and objects in chinese ink despite his blindness, and that the physical and tactile process of making the artwork was in ways more important than the end result.
His work made me think about the possibilities of using more than two dimensions in my artwork, and also about the physical process of creating, rather than the final piece of art. Ikon Gallery, Birmingham Visit
Last week I decided to visit the IKON Gallery in Birmingham centre for some inspiration. I looked at the work of two artists; John Flaxman and Timur Novikov, which I thought were worthy of writing something about.
John Flaxman was a British sculptor born in 1755 who was known internationally for his illustrations and sculptures. I became interested in his artwork because of his use of line. He drew everyday subjects in ordinary situations. He used just a few lines to define their shapes and was capable of capturing figure and movement in just a few pencil flourishes. One of the thinks I really liked was his drapery and depiction of fabric, the contrast between flowing lines and the angular architecture of buildings that surrounded his figures, and the way he was able to make them sit so compositionally well against each other. The illustrations themselves went beyond the drawing and into the physical, three-dimensional sculpture. Each line became a flowing shape within the sculpture.
John Flaxman began his career as a designer for Josiah Wedgwood, who was famous for his pottery. Flaxman had an interest in the classical and conventional values within art. He travelled to Rome for seven years of his life, where he produced many drawings and illustrations, which were then engraved. His drawing style of using simple lines to define shapes developed over these years.

Timur Novikov (1958 - 2002) was a Russian artist born in Leningrad whose work mostly consisted of textiles pieces. His colourful, in ways childlike artwork seem to have a personal meaning to the artist which is difficult to discern. Each piece is recognisably his creation, and they are extremely tactile pieces, with layered and appliqued fabric. This became more prominent as the artist became blind towards the end of his life.
His artwork is bright and iconic and the way he uses the textures and patterns within the fabric creates something quite playful and humorous. He became ill in later life and lost his sight.I have also included some examples of his work as a blind artist. I think it is quite interesting how he was capable of recreating images and objects in chinese ink despite his blindness, and that the physical and tactile process of making the artwork was in ways more important than the end result.
His work made me think about the possibilities of using more than two dimensions in my artwork, and also about the physical process of creating, rather than the final piece of art. Ikon Gallery, Birmingham Visit
Last week I decided to visit the IKON Gallery in Birmingham centre for some inspiration. I looked at the work of two artists; John Flaxman and Timur Novikov, which I thought were worthy of writing something about.
John Flaxman was a British sculptor born in 1755 who was known internationally for his illustrations and sculptures. I became interested in his artwork because of his use of line. He drew everyday subjects in ordinary situations. He used just a few lines to define their shapes and was capable of capturing figure and movement in just a few pencil flourishes. One of the thinks I really liked was his drapery and depiction of fabric, the contrast between flowing lines and the angular architecture of buildings that surrounded his figures, and the way he was able to make them sit so compositionally well against each other. The illustrations themselves went beyond the drawing and into the physical, three-dimensional sculpture. Each line became a flowing shape within the sculpture.
John Flaxman began his career as a designer for Josiah Wedgwood, who was famous for his pottery. Flaxman had an interest in the classical and conventional values within art. He travelled to Rome for seven years of his life, where he produced many drawings and illustrations, which were then engraved. His drawing style of using simple lines to define shapes developed over these years.

Timur Novikov (1958 - 2002) was a Russian artist born in Leningrad whose work mostly consisted of textiles pieces. His colourful, in ways childlike artwork seem to have a personal meaning to the artist which is difficult to discern. Each piece is recognisably his creation, and they are extremely tactile pieces, with layered and appliqued fabric. This became more prominent as the artist became blind towards the end of his life.
His artwork is bright and iconic and the way he uses the textures and patterns within the fabric creates something quite playful and humorous. He became ill in later life and lost his sight.I have also included some examples of his work as a blind artist. I think it is quite interesting how he was capable of recreating images and objects in chinese ink despite his blindness, and that the physical and tactile process of making the artwork was in ways more important than the end result.
His work made me think about the possibilities of using more than two dimensions in my artwork, and also about the physical process of creating, rather than the final piece of art. Ikon Gallery, Birmingham Visit
Last week I decided to visit the IKON Gallery in Birmingham centre for some inspiration. I looked at the work of two artists; John Flaxman and Timur Novikov, which I thought were worthy of writing something about.
John Flaxman was a British sculptor born in 1755 who was known internationally for his illustrations and sculptures. I became interested in his artwork because of his use of line. He drew everyday subjects in ordinary situations. He used just a few lines to define their shapes and was capable of capturing figure and movement in just a few pencil flourishes. One of the thinks I really liked was his drapery and depiction of fabric, the contrast between flowing lines and the angular architecture of buildings that surrounded his figures, and the way he was able to make them sit so compositionally well against each other. The illustrations themselves went beyond the drawing and into the physical, three-dimensional sculpture. Each line became a flowing shape within the sculpture.
John Flaxman began his career as a designer for Josiah Wedgwood, who was famous for his pottery. Flaxman had an interest in the classical and conventional values within art. He travelled to Rome for seven years of his life, where he produced many drawings and illustrations, which were then engraved. His drawing style of using simple lines to define shapes developed over these years.

Timur Novikov (1958 - 2002) was a Russian artist born in Leningrad whose work mostly consisted of textiles pieces. His colourful, in ways childlike artwork seem to have a personal meaning to the artist which is difficult to discern. Each piece is recognisably his creation, and they are extremely tactile pieces, with layered and appliqued fabric. This became more prominent as the artist became blind towards the end of his life.
His artwork is bright and iconic and the way he uses the textures and patterns within the fabric creates something quite playful and humorous. He became ill in later life and lost his sight.I have also included some examples of his work as a blind artist. I think it is quite interesting how he was capable of recreating images and objects in chinese ink despite his blindness, and that the physical and tactile process of making the artwork was in ways more important than the end result.
His work made me think about the possibilities of using more than two dimensions in my artwork, and also about the physical process of creating, rather than the final piece of art. Ikon Gallery, Birmingham Visit
Last week I decided to visit the IKON Gallery in Birmingham centre for some inspiration. I looked at the work of two artists; John Flaxman and Timur Novikov, which I thought were worthy of writing something about.
John Flaxman was a British sculptor born in 1755 who was known internationally for his illustrations and sculptures. I became interested in his artwork because of his use of line. He drew everyday subjects in ordinary situations. He used just a few lines to define their shapes and was capable of capturing figure and movement in just a few pencil flourishes. One of the thinks I really liked was his drapery and depiction of fabric, the contrast between flowing lines and the angular architecture of buildings that surrounded his figures, and the way he was able to make them sit so compositionally well against each other. The illustrations themselves went beyond the drawing and into the physical, three-dimensional sculpture. Each line became a flowing shape within the sculpture.
John Flaxman began his career as a designer for Josiah Wedgwood, who was famous for his pottery. Flaxman had an interest in the classical and conventional values within art. He travelled to Rome for seven years of his life, where he produced many drawings and illustrations, which were then engraved. His drawing style of using simple lines to define shapes developed over these years.

Timur Novikov (1958 - 2002) was a Russian artist born in Leningrad whose work mostly consisted of textiles pieces. His colourful, in ways childlike artwork seem to have a personal meaning to the artist which is difficult to discern. Each piece is recognisably his creation, and they are extremely tactile pieces, with layered and appliqued fabric. This became more prominent as the artist became blind towards the end of his life.
His artwork is bright and iconic and the way he uses the textures and patterns within the fabric creates something quite playful and humorous. He became ill in later life and lost his sight.I have also included some examples of his work as a blind artist. I think it is quite interesting how he was capable of recreating images and objects in chinese ink despite his blindness, and that the physical and tactile process of making the artwork was in ways more important than the end result.
His work made me think about the possibilities of using more than two dimensions in my artwork, and also about the physical process of creating, rather than the final piece of art.

Ikon Gallery, Birmingham Visit


Last week I decided to visit the IKON Gallery in Birmingham centre for some inspiration. I looked at the work of two artists; John Flaxman and Timur Novikov, which I thought were worthy of writing something about.

John Flaxman was a British sculptor born in 1755 who was known internationally for his illustrations and sculptures. I became interested in his artwork because of his use of line. He drew everyday subjects in ordinary situations. He used just a few lines to define their shapes and was capable of capturing figure and movement in just a few pencil flourishes. One of the thinks I really liked was his drapery and depiction of fabric, the contrast between flowing lines and the angular architecture of buildings that surrounded his figures, and the way he was able to make them sit so compositionally well against each other. The illustrations themselves went beyond the drawing and into the physical, three-dimensional sculpture. Each line became a flowing shape within the sculpture.

John Flaxman began his career as a designer for Josiah Wedgwood, who was famous for his pottery. Flaxman had an interest in the classical and conventional values within art. He travelled to Rome for seven years of his life, where he produced many drawings and illustrations, which were then engraved. His drawing style of using simple lines to define shapes developed over these years.

Timur Novikov (1958 - 2002) was a Russian artist born in Leningrad whose work mostly consisted of textiles pieces. His colourful, in ways childlike artwork seem to have a personal meaning to the artist which is difficult to discern. Each piece is recognisably his creation, and they are extremely tactile pieces, with layered and appliqued fabric. This became more prominent as the artist became blind towards the end of his life.

His artwork is bright and iconic and the way he uses the textures and patterns within the fabric creates something quite playful and humorous. He became ill in later life and lost his sight.
I have also included some examples of his work as a blind artist. I think it is quite interesting how he was capable of recreating images and objects in chinese ink despite his blindness, and that the physical and tactile process of making the artwork was in ways more important than the end result.

His work made me think about the possibilities of using more than two dimensions in my artwork, and also about the physical process of creating, rather than the final piece of art.

25/05/12

Today I braved the heat, covered myself in suncream and held onto my sketchbook for dear life and went into Birmingham to do some reportage illustrations!

Here is one of the illustrations I did today, black pen on A3 paper in my sketchbook, took about an hour maximum.

If anyone is interested in buying an A4 print of this illustration it will cost £20, which can be paid to my paypal account. If you are interested, just email me at murklaw@gmail.com.

-Murklaw (Nat Robinson)

Wahey!

14/05/12

First year at university is technically over. Just handed in three assignments’ worth of project work and I am FREE. Got the summer to do pretty much whatever I like in terms of illustration work.

I have a few commissions on the go and some good news; my local pub has decided to buy some of my illustrations and prints to hang on their walls! Very exciting and it will be so nice to have my work displayed somewhere instead of collecting dust in my portfolio.

I am in the process of updating my blog and gallery so there will be lots of new stuff to look at.

-Murklaw (Nat Robinson)